8 Followers
26 Following
MaryGB

But I don’t know what to do with those Tossed Salads and Scrambled Eggs.

I have always been an avid reader. I read fiction and nonfiction.  When I read fiction - It's almost a guarantee I am reading a romance novel.

Currently reading

Someone to Watch Over Me
Lisa Kleypas
Perfect Chemistry (Perfect Chemistry, #1) - Simone Elkeles Perfect Chemistry was a good read. It kept me interested, and the characters were mostly likeable. I had a couple of issues with it. Firstly, the author felt the need to continually reinforce the setting and character traits through the use of dialogue. This is fine, except that it was repeated over and over again. It was almost like 'Ok, we get it.' The author needs to trust that the readers will remember facts after they've been established, and not feel the need to remind us every few chapters. The dialogue felt unnatural at time because of this.
Also, The story is set in the Chicago suburbs, where I am from. I know the author is also from this area, and I was impressed that she used many real locations, however I could never quite figure out where the fictional town of Fairfield was supposed to be. It's a suburb in which the public high school serves both an upscale rich community, as well as a crime-ridden multi-ethnic neighborhood at the south. It was also supposed to be ON Lake Michigan, and I can't think of any suburbs that fit this description. That's ok, though, I can suspend that reality for the sake of fiction. The afteward did state that the author based the town on a suburb near her hometown.

Lastly, this book was full of cliches, and got a bit corny at times.

But overall, the storyline was good, and it touches on the common theme of star-crossed lovers who must somehow bridge the cultural gap between them in order to be together.

This book is told in the first person, which I normally do NOT like, but in this case the author switched the persepctive every chapter between the two main characters. This made the first person perspective work, because the reader got to experience the thoughts and feelings of both the hero and heroine.